Obligatory End/Beginning of the Year Post

Before you start a birding blog, you have to swear an oath to do an annual end of the year post followed by a beginning of the year post. It’s only after year three that they let you do both combined into one entry, so here is my end of 2015 / beginning of 2016 post for you!

If you have been reading (thanks!), you know that I try to do one specific challenge each year and that 2015 was my first motorless list. It was way more challenging and fun than I thought it would be, but I was also much more successful than I imagined. I ended the year at 137 species, including 9 life birds. But first, here is what I didn’t see:

Top Five Misses

5.) Ruddy Duck – The most common waterfowl I have never seen, and tons of records from my county this year.

4.) White-Eyed Vireo – According to eBird target species, this is the most common bird that I have never seen, period (although I wonder how many of those records are heard-only).

3.) Tennessee Warbler – The most common warbler that I missed.

2.) Wood Thrush – Relatively common, and heard at one point but never seen. Ugh.

1.) Eastern Towhee – Without a doubt the most common bird I didn’t see despite going looking for it a couple of times and again hearing one.

Hopefully all of these birds go down this year to vindicate me. But I did see plenty of good stuff last year too, so here you go:

Top Five Ticks

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak

5.) Blue Grosbeak – One of my motorless lifers, BLGR was also a nemesis that I slayed.

Common Goldeneye

Common Goldeneye

4.) Common Goldeneye – I didn’t realize that COGO would be one of my best birds of the year until near the end. The one I found at Foster Park in February ended up being the only one I saw all year, and it was even more unusual because it was in the shallow river.

Snow Goose

Snow Goose

3.) Snow Goose – Not an uncommon bird in Indiana, but definitely not typical in the eastern half of the state. This was only the fourth eBird record in Allen County.

American Avocet

American Avocet

2.) American Avocet – This bird was almost my #1 (more on that below), but still was a really great tick, and it was almost self-found! I set out in the morning with plans to go to this part of Eagle Marsh looking for shorebirds, and right before I left I saw the listserv report that two AMAVs were there, so I like to think that I would have found them anyway. They also would have been lifers if not for the flock of 100+ that I saw at Metzger Marsh in Ohio earlier in the spring.

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

1.) Black-Bellied Whistling Duck – This one feels like kind of a cop-out because of how easy it was to see and how long it stuck around at Franke Park, especially compared to the avocets above. But, it was a lifer and the least likely bird that I saw all year anywhere, and it gave me some incredible looks. I can’t count on seeing this bird anywhere near Indiana again any time soon.

Now for the current year. In 2016, for the fourth year in a row, my first bird was Northern Cardinal. I didn’t get a picture of that fellow in my yard, nor would many people care to see him, so instead here is a leucistic female that I saw during the Southwest Allen County Christmas Bird Count on January 2nd:

Leucistic Northern Cardinal

Leucistic Northern Cardinal

My assigned CBC territory was Fox Island, which after my time pedaling last year is now within easy biking distance of home, so I started out my new green (easier to type and say than “motorless”) list strong. I don’t have any new birds compared to last year yet, but as of this writing I am at 28 species, a number I didn’t hit until the second week of March in 2015.

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes

The best birds so far have been this surprising flock of Sandhill Cranes catching a thermal directly above my house. SACR is a gimme in Indiana, but usually not until March. These guys were migrating south crazy late. If I can have a “miss” yet, it is probably Red-Breasted Nuthatch. The one in my yard was around daily for over two months, but I have not seen it at all since we got back from our week in North Carolina. Oh, also Eastern Towhee. Again heard already but not seen.

My hope is to beat the 137 species from last year, but an aggressive goal is 152 which would be one more bird than my hilariously novice Indiana “big year” attempt from 2013.

Happy New Year, good birding, and good luck to all of you other listers out there!

Advertisements

GregAndBirds Presents: Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

The Black-Bellied Whistling Duck is a tropical bird with a foothold in the United States along the gulf coast. It has also been expanding its range northward in recent years, with strong patterns of vagrancy into the Midwestern and Northeastern states. However, it still triggers the rare bird alerts along the Great Lakes, and you can be sure that one in Fort Wayne is a big deal.

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

Regular readers of this blog (or even single-time readers of this blog) know that I live and die by the diagnostic shot: photographs with just enough detail to tell what bird is fuzzily, blurrily, obscuredly in the picture. Today’s feature is about as close as I get to crushing birds here, so indulge me.

Black-Bellied Low Rider

Black-Bellied Low Rider

BBWD represents life bird #250 for me, and for a milestone I could not have asked for a better bird. Not only is it a rare vagrant to my corner of the world, but it is a gorgeous duck that has hung around for five days at this point and acts totally tame.

Black-Bellied Hallux

Black-Bellied Hallux

Questions of provenance can also be put to rest, as this bird has both halluces present and accounted for and no band to be seen.

Black-Bellied Lift Off

Black-Bellied Lift Off

I managed to hang out with this bird for quite a while after work, significantly calming my nerves after thoughts that I may have missed it. I planned to chase it on my lunch break, but a car had somehow wrecked itself on the only exit ramp to my parking garage, effectively blocking everybody in and making me hyperventilate in anxiety over the thoughts that the bird would fly and I would miss it by a matter of hours. No worries though. This bird was super cool.

Black-Bellied Mallard Head

Black-Bellied Mallard Head

It even had a sense of humor, posing in comparison with some of the less desirable birds that it shared a pond with.

Trash Birds

Trash Birds

In fact, the company this bird kept made it all the more sexy by comparison. It was associating with some of the worst trash birds out there: dumped 4H geese, manky hybrid Mallards, and crippled Canada Geese, all of which are expected in the highly-trafficked, highly-peopled, highly hot-dog-bunned Shoaff Lake next to the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.

Stumpy

Stumpy

By comparison, this was like Shaquille O’Neal playing for the Washington Generals.

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

I will say this is a bird I have fantasized about. Although in my fantasies when it shows up in Indiana I am the one finding it. You can’t win them all, but I this wasn’t a bad consolation prize.